Appraisals


If you need to know the value of computer hardware, you’ve come to the right place. Valuing computer hardware (and sometimes testifying about that value) is the only thing we do.

We can value equipment based on a current valuation date, a date at some time in the past (historical) and a date in the future (prospective, or when used in leasing, "residual value" forecast).



  • Present-day Appraisal

  • The application of systematic methods to arrive at an estimate of value as of the current date. The fair market value of computer assets is most often sought but compensatory value and liquidation value are among many other definitions of value available to the appraiser. Depending on the use of the appraisal, these include Replacement Cost-New, Replacement Cost-Used, Actual Cash Value, Orderly Liquidation Value, and Forced Liquidation Value.

  • Retrospective (or Historical) Appraisal

  • The application of systematic methods to arrive at an estimate of value as of some date in the past. Taxes, insurance and lease litigation are the main reasons for historical value opinions.A common and fundamental problem for the appraiser developing a retrospective appraisal is that the property may not be available for physical inspection. Lacking equipment to inspect, the thorough appraiser may assemble relevant equipment documentation including purchase orders and equipment maintenance records.

  • Prospective Appraisal

  • The application of systematic methods to arrive at an estimate of value as of some date in the future. When applied to leased equipment, the term used is "residual value forecast". A prospective appraisal is no more reliable than the historical observations upon which its model is based. In fact, the accuracy of historical data is more important for purposes of forecasting than for ordinary appraisals because any inaccuracy of data is magnified over the period of projection. It is therefore necessary to verify the accuracy of historical price data.

All appraisals require accurate data to arrive at a reliable value conclusion, but with forecasts, any inaccuracy of data is magnified over the period of projection. That’s why we verify the accuracy and authenticity of all our historical price data both directly with the source and through our own internal verification mechanisms.

Since 1987 we have been developing a database of hundreds of thousands of actual sales transactions in the new and used computer marketplace. These have been collected, organized, and stored electronically for appraisal purposes. They are garnered from dealers and traders throughout the country as well as other appraisers and other sources that have been proven reliable.

For each observation in the database, we have captured information including a) name of manufacturer, b) model name, c) model number, d) equipment configuration, e) any other value-making information on the transaction, f) sales price, g) sale data, and h) market level (i.e. end-user, wholesale, liquidation, etc.).

We use this database to perform hundreds of appraisals each year for just a single PC or for an inventory of hundreds of thousands of assets valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars. If your computer inventory consists of thousands of units, you should check out our "grouped asset" appraisal methodology. It’s used where cost is a factor and reliability of the overall value conclusion (the sum of many individual assets) is more important and useful than accuracy of any single asset.

Need an appraisal right now ? Click here for a quote on an on-line appraisal.